Logo Leipzig University

Michael Goebel (Lateinamerika-Institut, FU Berlin, Germany)

Migration and Space in the Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and Nationalism in the Global South

Colloquium | Wednesday, 13 April 2016  | 05:15 pm
Date: Wednesday, 13 April 2016  | 05:15 pm - 06:45 pm
Location: GWZO | Specks Hof, Entrance A, 4th Floor | Reichsstraße 4–6 | 04109 Leipzig
Organization: Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 1199: “Processes of Spatialization under the Global Condition” (Germany)
Centre for Area Studies (U Leipzig, Germany)
Centre for the History and Culture of East Central Europe (at U Leipzig, Germany)
Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography (Leipzig, Germany)
Language: English

Summary:
The SFB Colloquium “Spaces of Migration – Eastern Europe in Comparison” will be opened by Michael Goebel, professor of global and Latin American history (FU Berlin, Germany). His talk is based on his latest book, Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism, which questions the relationship between migration and space. The colloquium will be moderated by Matthias Middell (Global and European Studies Institute and SFB 1199, U Leipzig).


Abstract:
This presentation examines Paris’s role as a hub for the global spread of anti-colonial ideas. It draws particular attention to the everyday concerns of colonial migrants in the metropole as the background for the development of their ideas; thus grounding the early intellectual history of liberation movements in Paris’s social history, and combining urban history with global history. This presentation argues that mutual aid associations, and other institutions typical in immigrant societies, turned into important vehicles for the early spread of anti-colonial nationalism. Exchanges between ethnic communities equally played a role, in that they highlighted global disparities and encouraged mutual learning curves. In line with the overall seminar series, this presentation poses two further questions  about the relationship between migration and space. Firstly, how did the urban space in Paris shape the protagonists’ experiences? Secondly, how did the political ideas that developed in this context relate to the territorial spaces of future nation states?

Biographical Note:
Michael Goebel has been a professor of global and Latin American history at the FU Berlin since June 2015. In July 2014, he received his habilitation in modern history. After training as an historian of Latin America in Germany and the United Kingdom, he worked at U College London (UK), the European University Institute  (Italy), and Harvard U (USA). As his latest publication shows, Michael Goebel has gradually become more interested in other world regions; trying to merge his major research interests of migration history and the global history of nationalism in his book, Anti-Imperial Metropolis: Interwar Paris and the Seeds of Third World Nationalism (Cambridge UP, 2015).