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Nina Glick-Schiller (U Manchester, UK/MPI Halle, Germany)

Multiscalar Perspectives: Studying and Theorizing about the Relationships Between Migrants and Cities

SFB Colloquium | Wednesday, 22 June 2016  | 05:15 pm
Date: Wednesday, 22 June 2016  | 05:15 pm - 06:45 pm
Location: GWZO | Specks Hof, Entrance A, 4th Floor | Reichsstraße 4–6 | 04109 Leipzig
Organization: Collaborative Research Centre (SFB) 1199: “Processes of Spatialization under the Global Condition” (Germany)
Centre for Area Studies (U Leipzig, Germany)
Centre for the History and Culture of East Central Europe (at U Leipzig, Germany)
Leibniz Institute for Regional Geography (Leipzig, Germany)

Summary
Nina Glick-Schiller, an emeritus professor of social anthropology at the University of Manchester (UK), and an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of New Hampshire (USA), will introduce a perspective on the question of migration and urban regeneration which is different to those normally found in public debates. The talk aims to pave the way for broader discussions on the issues of dispossession, displacement, emplacement, and the politics of social justice.


Abstract
This talk introduces a different perspective on the question of migration and urban regeneration which is different to those commonly found in debates about mobility, migrant integration, urban restructuring, and the struggles for rights to the city. I offer a multi-scalar conjunctural examination of the relationships between migrants and cities. Multi-scalar analysis explores the mutual constitution of the local, regional, national and global as processes of place making. Conjunctural analysis addresses transformations through time. Multi-scalar conjunctural analysis is thus an approach that is simultaneously a method and a theoretical orientation directed towards the transformations of social, political, economic, and cultural practice within multiple, intersecting, hierarchical, and institutionally linked networks of power. Unlike other methods for examining the relationships between migrants and cities, multi-scalar analysis offers an examination of the relationship of everyone everywhere to the dis-possessive power of contemporary capitalism, as these relations of power are being constituted and transformed. Therefore, this analysis paves the way for broader discussions about dispossession, displacement, emplacement, and the politics of social justice.

Biographical Note
The grandchild of immigrants to New York City, Nina Glick-Schiller has turned her lifelong interest in cities and migration into a comparative and historical perspective on migration, transnational and diasporic processes, methodological nationalism, urban restructuring and the displacements of poor and working people, including migrants. Her research has been conducted in Haiti, the United States, the United Kingdom and Germany and she has worked with migrants from all regions of the globe. She has published over 100 articles and nine books. Currently a co-editor of the international journal Anthropological Theory, Glick-Schiller is an emeritus professor of social anthropology at the University of Manchester (UK) and an emeritus professor of anthropology at the University of New Hampshire (USA), an associate of the Max Planck Institute of Social Anthropology (Halle/Saale, Germany) and an honorary professor at Aalborg University (Denmark).